News

November is Stomach Cancer Awareness Month. Led by the Stomach Cancer Foundation of Canada, Stomach Cancer Awareness Month provides support, education, information and advocacy for stomach cancer patients, survivors, caregivers and family members.

Several resources on stomach cancer are available via the MUHC Libraries:

For healthcare professionals:

  1. Books [1]:
    a. Devita, Hellman, and Rosenberg’s cancer : principles & practice of oncology (2015)
    b. Yamada’s textbook of gastroenterology (2016)
    c. Sleisenger and Fordtran’s gastrointestinal and liver disease : pathophysiology, diagnosis, management (2016)
    d. Textbook of gastrointestinal radiology (2015)

  2. Recently published articles [2]:
    a. Guidelines
    b. Systematic Reviews & Meta-Analyses
  3. Clinical summaries:
    a. Cochrane Clinical Answers
    b. UpToDate

For patients:

  1. McConnell Patient Resource Centre: Stomach Cancer Resources

For more information about stomach cancer or any other topic, contact your hospital librarian.

Published November 9, 2017.
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1 – Visit the Borrowing Library Materials page to find out more about our lending policy.

2 – PubMed searches designed by MUHC Librarians. Click the McGill Find Full Text button to find out whether the article is available via McGill (authentication with a McGill email and password is required to access McGill University’s electronic resources). Hospital staff without McGill ID may request articles from the MUHC Library. Visit the Interlibrary Loans page to find out more.

September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. Led by Ovarian Cancer Canada, Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month highlights the development of early detection techniques and novel treatments for ovarian cancer among the general public and health care professionals.

Several resources on ovarian cancer are available via the MUHC Libraries:


For healthcare professionals:

  1. Books [1]:
    a. Berek & Hacker’s gynecologic oncology (2015)
    b. Te Linde's operative gynecology (2015)
    c. Clinical gynecology (2015)
    d. Comprehensive gynecology (2017)
    e. Williams gynecology (2017)
    f. Devita, Hellman, and Rosenberg's cancer : principles & practice of oncology (2017)

  2. Recently published articles [2]:
    a. Guidelines
    b. Systematic Reviews & Meta-Analyses

  3. Clinical summaries:
    a. Cochrane Clinical Answers
    b. UpToDate

For patients:

  1. McConnell Patient Resource Centre: Ovarian Cancer Resources
  2. MUHC Patient Education Office: Ovarian Cancer Guides

For more information about ovarian cancer or any other topic, contact your hospital librarian.

Published August 31, 2017.
_________________________________________________________________________________
1 – Visit the Borrowing Library Materials page to find out more about our lending policy.

2 – PubMed searches designed by MUHC Librarians. Click the McGill Find Full Text button to find out whether the article is available via McGill (authentication with a McGill email and password is required to access McGill University’s electronic resources). Hospital staff without McGill ID may request articles from the MUHC Library. Visit the Interlibrary Loans page to find out more.

Journals and publishers are said to be predatory when they mislead researchers about fees and misrepresent their editorial boards and reviewers with the intent of making a profit. Like legitimate open-access journals, predatory journals charge publication fees to authors eager to be published, but unlike legitimate Open-Access journals, they have questionable or non-existent peer-review.

Predatory journals often have inconspicuous or official sounding names (Lancert instead of Lancet, Canadian Journal of Medicine instead of Canadian Medical Association Journal [CMAJ]). These journals tend to solicit submissions and offer editorial board membership by mass mailings. They may exaggerate their impact factor (verifiable in Web of Science) and promise authors rapid publication, undermining the peer-review process. Their websites may have spelling or grammar mistakes, and their contact addresses may be non-professional or unaffiliated with their publication (@gmail or @yahoo).

How can I avoid predatory journals when searching for articles online?

The best way to avoid predatory journals is by searching indexes and databases like Medline (PubMed or other platforms like Ovid, ProQuest, etc), Embase or Web of Science. Predatory journals are rarely indexed in reputable databases.

If you are looking for open-access articles, you can use the Directory of Open Access Journals, which requires journals to follow the Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing before being included in the directory.

Although Google Scholar can be a useful tool for finding new content for your research, it has been known to include predatory journals. If you have found an article through Google Scholar, it is good practice to double check if it can be found in other more reputable databases.

How can I check if a journal or publisher is predatory?

You may have already been contacted by a journal inviting you to submit your manuscript, become a member of their editorial board, or attend an unknown conference tangentially related to your discipline. It can be difficult to determine whether these are legitimate communications. Here are some questions to ask when in doubt:

  • Have you or any of your colleagues heard of this journal before?
  • Can you easily identify and contact the publisher, by telephone, email and mail?
  • Does the publisher charge a fee for publication? If so, can you easily find this information and understand what the fees are for?
  • Does the journal explain clearly the type of peer-review it uses?
  • Is it included in a reputable index (Medline, CINAHL, and Web of Science)? If not, is it part of the Directory of Open Access Journals?

For more information, see the Think Check Submit checklist or ask a librarian. Your hospital librarian can help investigate the legitimacy of the journal in question.

Be aware that once your research appears in a fraudulent journal, it may be difficult to have it removed and published in a legitimate journal. There will be no proper evaluation of your paper which could affect your scholarly reputation. Furthermore, publishing in a predatory journal can have a negative impact on your professional career by affecting funding decisions, hiring and promotion eligibility.

Further reading

Shamseer, L., Moher, D., Maduekwe, O., Turner, L., Barbour, V., Burch, R., . . . Shea, B. J. (2017).
Potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals: can you tell the difference? A cross-sectional comparison. BMC Medicine, 15(1), 28.

Sorokowski, P., Kulczycki, E., Sorokowska, A., & Pisanski, K. (2017).
Predatory journals recruit fake editor. Nature, 543(7646), 481-483.

References

McGill Library. Avoiding illegitimate OA journals.
http://www.mcgill.ca/library/services/open-access/illegitimate-journals

Think. Check. Submit.
http://thinkchecksubmit.org/check/

CARL/ABRC. Identifying and avoiding predatory publishers: a primer for researchers.
http://www.carl-abrc.ca/doc/predatory_pubs_primer-e.pdf

Published May 4th, 2017.

The MUHC Libraries website is your gateway to:

  • over 900 full-text electronic journals
  • more than 500 e-books
  • key databases such as Medline, Embase and CINAHL
  • and other specialized resources on drug information or nutrition and dietetics.

Until now, access to these resources was limited to computers on the MUHC network.

MUHC personnel can now access these resources on their personal computer or tablet from home or anywhere else, in a few easy steps.

Visit muhclibraries.ca/proxy for more details and instructions.

We welcome your feedback. If you have questions on how to verify whether the MUHC subscribes to a particular journal and/or how to locate an article or borrow an e-book, contact one of our librarians or come see us in person. Presentations and training sessions on a variety of topics are also available upon request.

Published March 28th, 2017.

The National Library of Medicine has released the 2017 update of their Medical Subject Headings, commonly known as MeSH. MeSH is a collection of standardized terms applied to articles in the Medline database.

A selection of 2017’s new MeSH headings include:

All details of changes to 2017 MeSH are available here.

When searching in PubMed or Ovid Medline, MeSH terms help to retrieve more relevant references than searching freely for words in the Title or Abstract.

Because of annual updates, it is important to check the term’s entry date – the year when the MeSH term started being applied to articles.

If the MeSH term has been introduced in recent years, it is important to search also the term in title/abstract or use the previous MeSH terms, otherwise older articles may not be captured.

To learn more about MeSH, including how to search PubMed and Ovid Medline more efficiently, register for a training session or contact your hospital librarian.

Published January 18, 2017.

The “My library” feature in Google Scholar can now be used to export multiple references at once. Until recently, references in Google Scholar could only be exported to EndNote one at a time.

To begin, open Google Scholar (https://scholar.google.ca/), and click Connect… (in the upper right corner of the page). Log in with your Google Account. If you do not have an account, you will be prompted to create one. Once logged in, conduct your search. Click the Save link under references that you’re interested in. When you have completed your screening, click on My Library, located on the left. You will find all your saved references.

Next, make sure your EndNote library is open. Select all your references by checking the box at the top (1), click the Export button (2) and select the EndNote (3) option. Depending on your settings, your references will be imported into your library automatically or downloaded (requiring a manual import into Endnote).

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact your hospital librarian. You can also learn more about EndNote and bibliographic databases by attending one of our upcoming workshops.

Published November 22, 2016.

Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms are designed to take the guesswork out of literature searching by using a single term to describe a subject. Nevertheless, identifying the appropriate MeSH term for your topic can sometimes be tricky when searching in Medline via Ovid or via PubMed.

However, if you already have relevant articles on your topic, looking at how they are indexed (which MeSH terms are used) can be a great place to start. The Yale MeSH Analyzer facilitates this process by generating an easy-to-read grid of MeSH terms from key articles you have already identified.

To use the tool, paste a list of up to 20 PMIDs (Unique identifier numbers used in PubMed) into the text box and click on “Go”. The MeSH Analyzer will retrieve the article metadata (subject headings, author keywords, etc.) from PubMed, and present it in either HTML or Excel format. Scanning the created grid will help you quickly identify appropriate MeSH terms for your search. It can also help understand why some articles are retrieved from a search and others are not.

Need help? Whether you need a few references on a topic or a more in-depth search of the literature, MUHC librarians are available to perform quality searches for you.

Contact your hospital librarian for more information on our literature searching service. A full calendar of workshops is also available to help you develop your searching skills.

Published September 19, 2016.

Slight changes have recently been made to Medline via Ovid. The default search now includes “As supplied by Publisher” records.

As supplied by Publisher” records include “Epub – Ahead of Print” and other newly published articles. Publishers submit these to the U.S. National Library of Medicine before a journal issue’s publication, to be findable more quickly in the Medline database.

As Supplied by Publisher” records, like “In Process” records, have not yet been indexed. This means that they have not yet been assigned Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). As of July 2016, 11% of records in Medline have not been assigned MeSH. Using only MeSH in your search will not retrieve these records. For a more comprehensive search, you must build up your strategy by searching for words in the titles and abstracts.

For example, to search for all articles on Multiple Sclerosis, you would have to use the MeSH for Multiple Sclerosis, as well as a search for “Multiple Sclerosis” in the title and abstract fields. See below:

  1. Multiple sclerosis/ (44122)
    – Searched using MeSH term

  2. Multiple sclerosis.tw (58327)
    .tw is a command that searches for the words in both the Title and Abstract fields.

  3. 1 or 2 (65456)

Consult our guide for more information on the differences between Medline via Ovid and PubMed. If you want to brush up on your searching skills, you can attend one of our workshops on Medline via Ovid or PubMed or contact your hospital librarian.

Published August 25, 2016.

MUHC librarians have recently updated the procedure to install the UpToDate mobile app on your mobile device.

Instructions are provided for configuring your access, based on your affiliation (MUHC or McGill).

For more information about UpToDate, contact your hospital librarian.

Published July 7, 2016, updated September 19, 2019.

Your MUHC Librarians are happy to announce the addition of a new resource for nutritionists to our collection: PEN (Practice-based Evidence in Nutrition).

PEN is a website developed by the Dietitians of Canada that delivers evidence-based guidance for your nutrition practice questions easily and efficiently.

You can access PEN using any computer at the MUHC. You’ll find the link to PEN in the Quick Links menu, on the side of the page, under the “MUHC” column. You can also bookmark the link in your browser for added convenience: http://www.pennutrition.com/site/MUHC. Note: When you have finished searching, please remember to close your browser window as only 5 users can access PEN at a time.

For questions about dietary supplements, natural and complementary alternatives, interactions and adverse effects, you also have access to Natural Medicines, also via the Quick Links menu or at https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com.

Other announcements will follow. For more information on accessing the MUHC Libraries’ collection, or to ask for help, please contact your hospital librarian.

Published February 1, 2016